Cops and cameras: Officer perceptions of the use of body-worn cameras in law enforcement

 

 

Wesley G. Jennings, Lorie A. Fridell, Mathew D. Lynch

Journal of Criminal Justice

18 October 2014

 

 

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047235214000853

 

Highlights

•Police officers are open to and supportive of the use of body-worn cameras.

•Officers believe that body-worn cameras can improve citizen behavior.

•Officers perceive that body-worn cameras can improve their behavior.

•Officers feel that body-worn cameras can improve their fellow officers’ behavior.

•Officers do not believe that body-worn cameras will impact willingness to respond.


Abstract

Purpose

There has been a recent surge in the adoption of and media attention to the use of body-worn cameras in law enforcement. Despite this increase in use and media attention, there is little to no research on officer perceptions of body-worn cameras.

Methods

This study relies on baseline data of officer perceptions toward body-worn cameras collected from surveys administered to Orlando Police officers who are participants in a randomized experiment evaluating the impact of body-worn cameras (Taser AXON Flex) in law enforcement.

Results

Results suggest that police officers are, by and large, open to and supportive of the use of body-worn cameras in policing, they would feel comfortable wearing them, and that they perceive a potential for benefits of body-worn cameras in improving citizen behavior, their own behavior, and the behavior of their fellow officers.

Conclusions

Officers are generally supportive of body-worn cameras, and they hold perceptions that these devices can be beneficial in positively affecting relevant outcomes. Study limitations and implications are also discussed.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee

www.hsjcc.on.ca/