Coming to grips with challenging behaviour: a cluster randomised controlled trial on the effects of a new care programme for challenging behaviour on burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff on dementia special care units

 

 

S.A. Zwijsen, D.L. Gerritsen, J.A. Eefsting, M. Smalbrugge, C.M.P.M. Hertogh, A.M. Pot

International Journal of Nursing Studies

October 13, 2014

 

 

http://www.journalofnursingstudies.com/article/S0020-7489(14)00261-2/abstract

 

Abstract

Background

Caring for people with dementia in dementia special care units is a demanding job. Challenging behaviour is one of the factors influencing the job satisfaction and burnout of care staff. A care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia might, next to diminishing the challenging behaviour of residents, improve job satisfaction and reduce the care staff's feelings of burnout.

Objectives

To determine the effects of a care programme for the challenging behaviour of nursing home residents with dementia on the burnout, job satisfaction and job demands of care staff.

Design

The care programme was implemented according to a stepped wedge design in which care units were randomly divided over five groups with different time points of starting with implementation.

Setting

17 Dutch dementia special care units.

Participants

Care staff members of the 17 units.

Intervention

The care programme consists of an education package and of various structured assessment tools that guide professionals through the multidisciplinary detection, analysis, treatment and evaluation of treatment of challenging behaviour.

Methods

Burnout, job satisfaction and job demands were measured before implementation, halfway through the implementation process and after all the care units had implemented the care programme. Burnout was measured with the Dutch version of the Maslach burnout inventory (UBOS-C, three subscales); job satisfaction and job demands were measured with subscales of the Leiden Quality of Work Questionnaire. Mixed model analyses were used to determine effects. Care staff could not be blinded for the intervention.

Results

Of the 1441 questionnaires, 645 were returned (response 45%, 318 control measurements, 327 intervention measurements) by 380 unique care staff members. Significant effects were found on job satisfaction (0.93, 95% CI 0.48 to 1.38). On the other outcomes, no significant changes in the scores were found.

Conclusion

Positive effects of using the Grip on Challenging behaviour care programme were found on job satisfaction, without an increase in job demands.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Human Services and Justice Coordinating Committee

www.hsjcc.on.ca/